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Small molecule

Small molecules remain a common treatment option, with a chemical compound as its active ingredient.1,2 Small molecules are usually administered orally but may also be injected or infused.2


Small-molecule drugs may provide the best or only current way to treat certain diseases. Because of their size, these compounds can pass through cell walls to engage targets inside the cell.1 They can also be designed to cross the blood-brain barrier and engage targets that may contribute to neurological illnesses.3


Learn more about small molecule targets:
KRASG12C, MCL-1, proteasome.

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References

1. National Cancer Institute, Dictionary of cancer terms: small-molecule drug. https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/small-molecule-drug. Accessed 4/5/2019. 2. ASCO Cancer.net, Understanding targeted therapy. https://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/how-cancer-treated/personalized-and-targeted-therapies/understanding-targeted-therapy. Accessed 4/5/2019. 3. Pardridge WM. Drug transport across the blood-brain barrier. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2012;32(11):1959-1972.