Pipeline

Explore our investigational agents and clinical trials across a range of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies

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Clinical Trials:

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BiTE® TECHNOLOGY
HLE BiTE® TECHNOLOGY
ONCOLYTIC IMMUNOTHERAPY
MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY
SMALL MOLECULE
XmAb® ANTIBODY
DARPin® TECHNOLOGY

ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

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ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

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COLORECTAL CANCER

GASTRIC CANCER

GLIOBLASTOMA

GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE

HEAD AND NECK CANCER

HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

LUNG CANCER

MULTIPLE MYELOMA

NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA

PAROXYSMAL NOCTURNAL HEMOGLOBINURIA

PEDIATRIC SOLID TUMORS

PROSTATE CANCER

THROMBOCYTOPENIA

OTHER SOLID TUMORS

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an aggressive leukemia characterized by a proliferation of lymphoblasts or lymphocytes in the blood and bone marrow. It can metastasize to the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, central nervous system, and other organs. ALL can progress quickly.1 In 2020, approximately 450,000 new cases of leukemia and 320,000 deaths from leukemia are expected to occur globally.2

ALL is relatively uncommon—but serious: approximately 6,000 cases are diagnosed in the United States annually, with 25% of patients dying from the disease.3 The estimated overall incidence of ALL in Europe is 1.28 per 100,000 individuals annually.4

ALL likely begins with the malignant transformation of either B or T cell progenitor cells. The surfaces of these cells typically express cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, and CD34, which could be potential targets.1

Molecule(s) under investigation:
Blinatumomab

REFERENCES
1. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/leukemia/hp/adult-all-treatment-pdq. Accessed 4/20/2020. 2. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 4. Hoelzer D, Bassan R, Dombret H, et al. Ann Oncol. 2016;27(suppl 5):v69-v82.

Acute myeloid leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive leukemia where an excess of myeloblasts are found in the blood and bone marrow.1 In 2020, approximately 450,000 new cases of leukemia and 320,000 deaths from leukemia are expected to occur globally.2 Mortality remains high in patients with AML: of the estimated 20,000 cases diagnosed in the United States in 2020, almost 11,000 will die, revealing a clear and urgent unmet need for better treatment options.3

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 176
AMG 330
AMG 397
AMG 427
AMG 553
AMG 673

REFERENCES
1. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/leukemia/patient/adult-aml-treatment-pdq. Accessed 4/21/2020. 2. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020.

Breast cancer

Although breast cancer survival has improved with enhanced detection and new treatment options, more than a quarter of a million new cases continue to be diagnosed in the US every year, resulting in more than 40,000 deaths.1

HER2+ status carries a diminished prognosis compared with other mutations, making it essential that patients have access to HER2-targeted treatment options.1

Molecule(s) under investigation:
ABP 980

REFERENCE
1. American Cancer Society. Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2017-2018. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2017.

Colorectal cancer

In 2020, there will be more than 100,000 new cases of colon cancer and 43,000 new cases of rectal cancer in the United States.1 Globally, approximately 1,160,000 new cases of colon cancer and 740,000 new cases of rectum cancer are expected to occur in 2020.2 Overall incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been declining over the past several decades, but rates are increasing for patients under the age of 55.1 This increase led the American Cancer Society to update recommendations in 2020 to begin screening at age 45 for people of average risk.3

Risk factors for CRC include obesity, physical inactivity, smoking and alcohol use, diet, and a family history of the disease.1 The 5-year survival rate for CRC is 65% for all stages and 14% for patients diagnosed with metastatic disease.4

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 510

REFERENCES
1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 2. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/acs-recommendations.html. Accessed 4/21/2020. 4. Cancer.Net. https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/colorectal-cancer/statistics. Accessed 4/21/2020.

GASTRIC CANCER

It is estimated that nearly 28,000 Americans will be diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2020, and more than 11,000 will die from the disease.1 Globally, in 2020, approximately 1,090,000 new cases of gastric cancer and more than 825,000 deaths will occur.2 Gastroesophageal junction cancer is a type of gastroesophageal cancer.3

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 199
AMG 910

REFERENCES
1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 2. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. Lin D, Khan U, Goetze TO, et al. Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book. 2019;39:e88-e95.

Glioblastoma

Glioblastoma is a rare, but aggressive and devastating primary brain tumor that is fatal to nearly all patients within 5 years of diagnosis and severely disrupts the day-to-day functioning of patients and their families.1,2 Tumors of the brain and central nervous system carry a high rate of mortality; three-quarters of the nearly 24,000 patients who are diagnosed die every year in the United States.3 Globally, in 2020, approximately 310,000 new cases of tumors of the brain and central nervous system will be diagnosed and more than 250,000 deaths will occur.4

Glioblastomas are predominantly composed of abnormal astrocytic cells and may be isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)–wild-type or IDH-mutant. IDH wild-type are more common, more aggressive, and carry a poorer prognosis than IDH-mutant tumors.5 Treatment is usually multidisciplinary, based on the types of cells involved; however, the prognosis is generally grim, with a low median survival based on currently approved treatment options.1,5 Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a tumor-specific mutant that promotes tumor cell growth and is expressed in approximately one-third of glioblastoma cases, making it a rational therapeutic target for glioblastoma.6,7

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 596

REFERENCES
1. Ostrom QT, Cioffi G, Gittleman H, et al. Neuro Oncol. 2019;21(suppl 5):v1-v100. 2. Oberndorfer S, Hutterer M. Curr Opin Oncol. 2019;31(6):548-553. 3. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 4. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 5. American Brain Tumor Association. https://www.abta.org/tumor_types/glioblastoma-gbm/. Accessed 4/21/2020. 6. An Z, Aksoy O, Zheng T, Fan QW, Weiss WA. Oncogene . 2018;37(12):1561-1575. 7. Aldape KD, Ballman K, Furth A, et al. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2004;63(7):700-707.

Graft versus host disease

Graft versus host disease (GvHD) occurs when T cells donated during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) attack healthy tissues in the host.1 Acute GvHD is transient and occurs soon after transplantation, usually affecting the skin, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract.1,2

The exact incidence of acute GvHD after allogeneic HSCT is unknown. Reported incidence rates range from 9% to 50% in patients who receive an allogeneic HSCT from a genotypically human leukocyte antigen identical sibling.3

Chronic GvHD, on the other hand, is one of the leading causes of complications and death following allogeneic HSCT.1 The exact incidence of chronic GvHD after HSCT is unknown. While chronic GvHD occurs in approximately 40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients, reported incidence rates range from 6% to 80%, depending upon the presence of risk factors and the diagnostic criteria used.4

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 592

REFERENCES
1. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. https://www.lls.org/treatment/types-of-treatment/stem-cell-transplantation/graft-versus-host-disease. Accessed 4/21/2020. 2. Toubai T, Sun Y, Reddy P. Best Pract Res Clin Haematol. 2008;21(2):101-117. 3. UpToDate. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clinical-manifestations-diagnosis-and-grading-of-acute-graft-versus-host-disease. Accessed 4/21/2020. 4. UpToDate. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clinical-manifestations-diagnosis-and-grading-of-chronic-graft-versus-host-disease. Accessed 4/21/2020.

Hepatocellular carcinoma

It has been estimated that liver cancer, which includes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic bile duct cancer, will have around 43,000 new cases and 30,000 deaths in the United States in 2020.1 Globally, the estimated number of cases of liver cancer is approximately 880,000 and the estimated number of deaths is more than 820,000.2 Factors that increase the risk of HCC include hepatitis B and/or C infection, cirrhosis, and heavy alcohol or tobacco use.3

Molecule(s) under investigation:
Talimogene laherparepvec

REFERENCES
1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 2. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/liver/hp/adult-liver-treatment-pdq. Accessed 4/21/2020.

Head and neck cancer

Cancers that begin in the squamous cells that line the mucosa of the head and neck (mouth, nose, and throat) are collectively called head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.1 Globally, head and neck cancer accounts for approximately 550,000 cases annually. In the United States, about 3% of all cancers are head and neck cancer, with approximately 63,000 Americans developing head and neck malignancies annually.2

The risk of head and neck cancer typically increases with tobacco and alcohol use as well as infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV infection is also an important prognostic factor that can impact treatment approach.1

Molecule(s) under investigation:
Talimogene laherparepvec

REFERENCES
1. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/head-neck-fact-sheet. Accessed 4/21/2020. 2. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. https://www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Clinical-Topics/Head-and-Neck-Cancer/. Accessed 4/21/2020.

Lung cancer

Despite recent advances, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and 5-year survival rates remain low.1,2 Globally, in 2020, the estimated incidence and death numbers of lung and bronchus cancer will be more than 2,210,000 and 1,860,000, respectively.3 In the United States, it is estimated that there will be 228,000 new cases and 135,000 deaths from the disease in 2020.4

Scientific efforts to date have focused on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which accounts for 85% of all cases; the majority of these (almost 60%) are diagnosed with advanced disease. NSCLC is a heterogeneous disease and treatment is often driven by biomarkers.5 Although less common, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is more aggressive; it carries a worse prognosis, metastasizes rapidly, and sometimes results in death in a matter of a few weeks.6,7 Amgen is committed to helping patients with NSCLC and SCLC.

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 119
AMG 510
AMG 757

REFERENCES
1. American Lung Association. https://www.lung.org/lung-health-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/lung-cancer/resource-library/lung-cancer-fact-sheet. Accessed 4/21/2020. 2. Bray F, Ferlay J, Soerjomataram I, Siegel RL, Torre LA, Jemal A. CA Cancer J Clin. 2018;68(6):394-424. 3. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 4. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 5. Ahmadzada T, Kao S, Reid G, Boyer M, Mahar A, Cooper WA. J Clin Med. 2018;7(6):153. 6. Pham DC, Awad Z, Hoppe BS, Hew J, Ning K. J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep. 2017;5(4):1-3. 7. Demedts IK, Vermaelen KY, van Meerbeeck JP. Eur Respir J. 2010;35(1):202-215.

Melanoma

Skin cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis in the United States.1 Among different types of skin cancer, melanoma is much less common but causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths.1 In 2020, it is estimated that around 100,000 new melanomas will be diagnosed and more than 6,800 deaths are expected to occur.1 Globally, in 2020, the estimated incident cases of melanoma of skin will be more than 301,000 and the estimated number of deaths will be near to 64,000.2

Like most cancers, the risk of melanoma rises with age, but it is the most common cancer in young adults aged 25–29 years and the second most common in those aged 15–29 years. And despite well-recognized and avoidable risk factors, the incidence of melanoma continues to rise.3 With such high mortality rates—and high stakes—a continued search for enhanced treatment approaches is vital.

Molecule(s) under investigation:
Talimogene laherparepvec

REFERENCES
1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 2. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/skin/hp/melanoma-treatment-pdq. Accessed 4/21/2020.

Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is the second-most common blood cancer.1 In the United States, it is estimated that there will be nearly 32,000 new cases in 2020, and almost 13,000 deaths.2 Globally, in 2020, the estimated incident cases of multiple myeloma will be around 169,000 and the estimated number of deaths will reach 112,000.3 Despite increased availability of novel agents, the disease is characterized by a pattern of recurrent relapses and remains incurable for the majority of patients.4,5

Multiple myeloma is a B cell malignancy in which abnormal, clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate in the bone marrow, causing bone destruction.6 Myeloma cells have increased dependence on proteasome function.7,8 The proteasome also activates nuclear factor kappa B signaling, which upregulates antiapoptotic factors, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors that promote survival of myeloma cells.8-10 This makes the proteasome and apoptotic factors targets for further investigation.

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 176
AMG 397
AMG 420
AMG 424*
AMG 701
Carfilzomib

*Developed in collaboration with Xencor.

REFERENCES
1. Cancer.Net. https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/multiple-myeloma/statistics. Accessed 4/21/2020. 2. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 3. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 4. Sherrod AM, Hari P, Mosse CA, Walker RC, Cornell RF. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2016;51(1):2-12. 5. Durie BG, Moreau P, Sonneveld P, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2012;30(suppl 15). Abstract 8095. 6. National Cancer Institute. https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/mulmy.html. Accessed 4/21/2020. 7. Moreau P, Richardson PG, Cabo M, et al. Blood. 2012;120(5):947-959. 8. Kubiczkova L, Pour L, Sedlarikova L, Hajek R, Sevcikova S. J Cell Mol Med. 2014;18(6):947-961. 9. Palumbo A, Anderson K. N Engl J Med. 2011;364(11):1046-1060. 10. Chen D, Frezza M, Schmitt S, Kanwar J, Dou QP. Curr Cancer Drug Targets.. 2011;11(3):239-253.

NON-HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs) represent a heterogenous group of lymphoproliferative malignancies that generally originate in lymphoid tissue.1 In the United States, it is estimated that there will be over 77,000 new cases in 2020 and nearly 20,000 deaths.2 Globally, in 2020, the estimated incident cases of NHL will be more than 530,000 and the estimated number of deaths will be approximately 260,000.3

NHL is far more common than Hodgkin's lymphoma, less predictable, and more likely to spread to extranodal sites.1,4 Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of NHL (22%), followed by chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (18%) and follicular lymphoma (11%).5,6 DLBCL is a fast-growing lymphoma.6 Dismal outcomes for relapsed or refractory DLBCL demonstrate a clear need for more effective therapeutic options.7

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 397
AMG 562
Blinatumomab
ABP 798*

*Developed in collaboration with Allergan plc.

REFERENCES
1. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/lymphoma/hp/adult-nhl-treatment-pdq. Accessed 4/21/2020. 2. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 3. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 4. Siegel RL, Miller KD, Jemal A. CA Cancer J Clin. 2020;70(1):7-30. 5. Lymphoma Research Foundation. https://lymphoma.org/aboutlymphoma/nhl/. Accessed 4/21/2020. 6. Lymphoma Research Foundation. https://lymphoma.org/aboutlymphoma/nhl/dlbcl/. Accessed 4/21/2020. 7. Crump M, Neelapu SS, Farooq U, et al. Blood. 2017;130(16):1800-1808.

Pediatric solid tumors

In the United States, in 2020, an estimated 11,000 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed among children, and nearly 1,200 children under the age of 15 are expected to die from cancer.1 Worldwide, the average annual incidence of cancer in children aged <15 years is 140 new cases per million children, although there are threefold variations between world regions and ethnic groups.2

Although many hematologic malignancies are among the most common cancers in children and young adults, solid tumors remain a major challenge.1,3 Pediatric solid tumors are a group of nonhematologic, extracranial cancers that occur during childhood. This heterogeneous group of tumors represents approximately 40% of all pediatric cancers.4

Given the unique biology and challenges associated with cancer in pediatric patients, this area represents a special and critical focus for continued research.5

Molecule(s) under investigation:
Talimogene laherparepvec

REFERENCES
1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 2. American Cancer Society. https://canceratlas.cancer.org/. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. Crist WM, Kun LE. N Engl J Med. 1991;324(7):461-471. 4. Allen-Rhoades W, Whittle SB, Rainusso N. Pediatr Rev. 2018;39(2):57-67. 5. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/research/areas/childhood. Accessed 4/21/2020.

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH; also called Marchiafava-Micheli disease) is an acquired disorder that leads to the premature destruction and impaired production of erythrocytes. It is usually diagnosed in young adulthood and is caused by acquired mutations in the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene.1 There are approximately 1–1.5 cases per million individuals worldwide diagnosed with this rare condition.2

PNH leads to recurring episodes of hemolysis-related symptoms such as fatigue, pallor, dyspnea, and tachycardia. More serious sequelae may include infections, thrombosis or hemorrhage, and patients are at an increased risk for the development of leukemia.1

Molecule(s) under investigation:
ABP 959

REFERENCES
1. National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. www.rarediseases.info.nih.gov. Accessed 4/21/2020. 2. Wong EKS, Kavanagh D. Semin Immunopathol. 2018;40(1):49-64.

Prostate cancer

Early detection and a range of treatments have made prostate cancer quite manageable for most of the men diagnosed (estimated to be more than 190,000 in the United States in 2020); but there remains an unmet need for new treatment options in patients with advanced, castrate-resistant disease, which is responsible for nearly all prostate cancer-related deaths.1,2 In the United States it is estimated that over 33,000 men will die from prostate cancer in 2020.1 Globally, in 2020, the estimated incident cases of prostate cancer is 1,356,000 and the estimated number of deaths is around 379,000.3

Unlike prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has the potential to serve as both a radiodiagnostic marker and as a target for new therapies.4

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 160
AMG 212
AMG 509*

*Developed in collaboration with Xencor.

REFERENCES
1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2020. 2. Lee DJ, Cha EK, Dubin JM, et al. BJU Int. 2012;109(7):968-985. 3. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/tomorrow. Accessed 4/21/2020. 4. Chang SS. Rev Urol. 2004;6(suppl 10):S13-S18.

Thrombocytopenia

Thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) is a common complication in patients with cancer, most often resulting from the use of chemotherapy.1,2 Symptoms may include excessive bleeding, increased bruising (purpura), petechiae, bloody stools or urine, severe headaches, visual disturbances, confusion, and fatigue.2

Molecule(s) under investigation:
Romiplostim

REFERENCES
1. Hassan MN, Waller EK. Oncology (Williston Park). 2015;29(4):295-296.  2. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects/bleeding-bruising. Accessed 4/21/2020. 

Other solid tumors

The treatment of solid tumors has undergone multiple revolutions in the last generation. Different types of chemotherapies are available to disrupt the cell cycle, as well as hormone therapies for certain tumors. A better understanding of pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted therapies such as monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors.1

Now immunotherapies are used to activate the immune system against a growing number of solid tumors.1,2 Some of the advances currently under investigation include bispecific antibodies, checkpoint inhibitors, oncolytic viruses, and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies—as well as combinations including 1 or more of these approaches.2,3

There is still much to discover in the treatment of solid tumors.

Molecule(s) under investigation:
AMG 404
AMG 506*
AMG 510
Talimogene laherparepvec

*Developed in collaboration with Molecular Partners.

REFERENCES
1. Gatzka MV. Cancers (Basel). 2018;10(6):155. 2. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/treatment-types/immunotherapy/what-is-immunotherapy. Accessed 4/21/2020. 3. Baeuerla PA, Kufer P, Bargou R. Curr Opin Mol Ther. 2009;11(1):22-30.

All clinical trial information current as of 10/8/2019.

Please note that trial status and parameters may change at any time; please contact a trial site or investigator for the latest information on a given trial.

Amgen’s product pipeline will change over time as molecules move through the drug development process, including processing to market or failing in clinical trials, due to the nature of the development process. The descriptions herein contain forward-looking statements that involve significant risks and uncertainties, including those discussed in Amgen’s most recent Form 10-K and in Amgen’s periodic reports on Form 10-Q and Form 8-K, and actual results may vary materially. Amgen is providing this information as of the date above and does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this table as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.